An analysis of the setting of the story of crysanthemums

She is then transformed briefly into a vivacious young girl before she realizes that her fantasies and the stranger are both cruelly fraudulent. Meanwhile her husband is largely unaware of the deeply disturbing metamorphosis his wife has undergone as he sits beside her at the end of the story, steering their little roadster into town to share a rare night out together. The story opens peacefully.

An analysis of the setting of the story of crysanthemums

The sun is not shining, and fog covers the valley.

A summary of Themes in John Steinbeck's The Chrysanthemums. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Chrysanthemums and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 75, lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed. Summary and Analysis The Chrysanthemums Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List In this story, we encounter a woman who has led a systematic, slumbering farm existence until she unexpectedly encounters an unusual peddler.

Her apron covers her dress, and gloves cover her hands. As she works away at her chrysanthemums, she steals occasional glances at the strange men. Her house, which stands nearby, is very clean.

Odour of Chrysanthemums Analysis

The strangers get into their Ford coupe and leave. Elisa looks down at the stems of her flowers, which she has kept entirely free of pests.

Henry appears and praises her work. Elisa seems pleased and proud. Henry says he wishes she would turn her talents to the orchard.

She responds eagerly to this suggestion, but it seems he was only joking.

SparkNotes: The Chrysanthemums

When she asks, he tells her that the men were from the Western Meat Company and bought thirty of his steers for a good price. He suggests they go to the town of Salinas for dinner and a movie to celebrate.

Henry leaves, and Elisa turns her attention back to her chrysanthemums. A wagon with a canvas top driven by a large bearded man appears on the road in the distance.

When he gets out of the wagon, Elisa sees that he is big and not very old. He wears a ragged, dirty suit, and his hands are rough. They continue to make small talk, and Elisa is charmed when the tinker says he simply follows good weather. They discuss the flowers, and the tinker says that he has a customer who wants to raise chrysanthemums.

Excited, Elisa says he can take her some shoots in a pot filled with damp sand. She takes off her hat and gloves and fills a red pot with soil and the shoots.

Elisa gives the tinker instructions to pass along to the woman. She explains that the most care is needed when the budding begins. She speaks from a kneeling position, growing impassioned.

Sobered, Elisa finds two pans for him to fix. As the tinker works, she asks him if he sleeps in the wagon. She says she wishes women could live the kind of life he does.

An analysis of the setting of the story of crysanthemums

After paying him fifty cents, she says that she can do the same work he does.analysis of the chrysanthemums a feminine thing to do, which is why she continues to pursue gardening.

Another example of how society’s gender roles prohibit women from their potential is from the story The Yellow Wallpaper. But we've already told you a bit about him in "In a Nutshell," so for now we'll just stick to what's relevant to the story.

For one thing, Steinbeck was a local boy. Many of his novels and stories, "The Chrysanthemums" included, take place in and around the Salinas Valley, so he's on familiar ground in this one. The Chrysanthemums Analysis Literary Devices in The Chrysanthemums.

An analysis of the setting of the story of crysanthemums

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory. Setting. The Big PictureIt's hard to talk about setting in a Steinbeck story without zooming out to talk about the man himself. But we've already told you a bit about him in "In a Nutshell," so for now we'l. Read on to take a trip to the Salinas Valley while learning about the plot and setting of Steinbeck's 'The Chrysanthemums.' 'The Chrysanthemums': Synopsis When many of us think about California, we probably imagine lots of warm, sunny days, but it gets cold in the Golden State, too.

Of the first story in The Long Valley, “The Chrysanthemums,” Steinbeck wrote: “It is entirely different and is designed to strike without the reader's knowledge. Henry leaves, and Elisa turns her attention back to her chrysanthemums. A wagon with a canvas top driven by a large bearded man appears on the road in the distance.

A misspelled sign advertises the man’s services as a tinker who repairs pots and pans. The wagon turns into Elisa’s yard.

The Chrysanthemums